The Ethics of Return Migration and Education: Transnational Duties in the US-Mexico Corridor

Event Date: 
Tuesday, April 24, 2018
Event Time: 
12:00 p.m.
Location: 
019 Bendheim Hall

The Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination will hold a lunch seminar, "The Ethics of Return Migration and Education: Transnational Duties in the US-Mexico Corridor," on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, in 019 Bendheim Hall, at 12:00 p.m. The session will feature guest speaker, Professor Juan Espindola is an Assistant Professor in the Education Program at the Center for Research and Teaching in Economics (CIDE) in Mexico City. The event is open to Princeton University faculty and students only. To attend the event, RSVP to Angella Sandford

Profs. Espindola will discuss his collaborative research with Mónica Jacobo in which they argue that most prominent normative theories on immigration neglect a critical dimension of the migratory phenomenon, a neglect that blinds them to important rights that, under some circumstances, immigrants ought to have as a matter of justice. Specifically, they argue that these theories fail to appreciate that the children of immigrant families (regardless of whether they were born in their parents’ country or in the host country) should benefit from educational rights addressing needs that are particular to their situation. Since these children may be forced to move between their parents’ homeland and the nation to which the latter migrated, they must have a right to receive an education that prepares them to transition between the two nations and develop fully in both places. We contend that the duty to provide for this right must be discharged jointly by both nations.

Prof. Juan Espindola is an Assistant Professor in the Education Program at the Center for Research and Teaching in Economics (CIDE) in Mexico City. His research areas include educational equality, transitional justice, and immigration. He is the author of Transitional Justice after German Reunification. Exposing Unofficial Collaborators (Cambridge University Press, 2015).