How Italy's Humanitarian Corridors Have Created Pathways to Protection in Europe

Event Date: 
Thursday, April 19, 2018
Event Time: 
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Location: 
019 Bendheim Hall
Speakers: 
Dr. Claire Higgins
Event Type: 
RSVP Required
Faculty/Student Only
Princeton University, Office of Communications, Daniel A. Day (2017)

The Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination will hold a lunch seminar, "How Italy's Humanitarian Corridors Have Created Pathways to Protection in Europe," on Thursday, April 19, 2018, in 019 Bendheim Hall, at 12:00 p.m. The session will feature guest speaker, Dr. Claire Higgins, Senior Research Associate at the Andrew and Renata Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law. The event is open to Princeton University faculty and students only. To attend the event, RSVP to Angella Sandford.

In late 2015, the Italian church community established a program of "Humanitarian Corridors" - the Corridoi Umanitari - to fly 1,000 mostly Syrian asylum seekers to Italy from Lebanon. Since then, the model has been expanded in Italy and adopted in France. Based on interviews with church representatives, Dr. Higgins' work situates the Corridors within the context of protected entry procedures more broadly, and provides an overview of their origin and operation.

Dr. Claire Higgins is a Senior Research Associate at the Andrew and Renata Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law. She is the author of Asylum by Boat: Origins of Australia's Refugee Policy (NewSouth, 2017) and a Fulbright Postdoctoral Scholar at Georgetown University, Washington D.C., in 2018. Claire previously completed doctoral study in History as a Clarendon Scholar at Merton College, the University of Oxford, writing on the development of Australian refugee policy. At the Kaldor Centre Claire’s research concerns refugee status determination in historical context, and alternative policies for processing asylum seekers. Her research on protected entry procedures has received funding under the Margaret George Award at the National Archives of Australia, a Travelling Fellowship from the Australian Academy of the Humanities, and a Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Australian European University Institute Fellowship Association Inc.